Masters Golf 2019

Masters Golf 2019 Live : Given the legendary control the Masters Tournament Committee 2019 has over Masters Golf 2019 its coursefrom SubAir systems instantaneously sucking rainfall out of the greens to an army of laborers nipping At the most basic level, rain reduces roll in the fairways and makes the greens slightly more receptive to shots coming in at steeper angles. The lack of roll in the fairway doesn’t mean much to players like Rory McIlroy, who can carry Masters Golf 2019 but for players with mid-pack power Masters Golf 2019 picking entirely different lines off the tee.

Winner Rory McIlroy  Yes, he’s the favorite. Yes, he’s playing the hottest golf in the world right now. But I’ve been picking McIlroy in this space frequently over the last few years, and it’s been all for naught. Not this time. Not while I’m attending Augusta National for the first time and have watched him smoke the ball off the practice tees. Rory McIlroy is going to win the Masters. He’s the easy chose for a top 10 lock each year or a backdoor top five, but I think he gets it done here. Let’s just say … it’s in the air.

Sleeper — Adam Scott (40-1): I was tempted to go with Patrick Reed (50-1) here, until I remembered there has not been a back-to-back champion since Tiger Woods and there’s only been two in the last half-century. So sorry, Patrick, it just ain’t happening. Scott is exceedingly interesting with five top 15 finishes in his last eight Masters. It may only take him being in the zone on the greens Sunday to be the difference between another one of those finishes and a second green jacket.

Top 10 lock — Justin Thomas: My normal choice in this space is McIlroy — for obvious reasons — when I do not pick him to win. Instead, I default to Thomas because I sure am not going with my other secondary choice in Jordan Spieth. Seeing Thomas improve in each of his three outings at Augusta National has me believing.

Top 5 in order: Rory McIlroy, Tony Finau, Jon Rahm, Justin Thomas, Justin Rose

Surprise prediction: Phil Mickelson will miss the cut. Lefty has missed two cuts in the last five Masters despite his stellar play over most of his career. It’s hot here in Augusta, and the Masters is going to get away from someone quickly. If Mickelson is not nails on Thursday, it may be over before it even starts for him.

It’s that time of the year where everyone in the golf world has one question on their mind: Who are you picking to win the 2019 Masters? With an 87-man field featuring generational talent going head-to-head at Augusta National, rarely has such a call ever been more difficult.

All eyes are on Rory McIlroy this year as The Ulsterman looks to complete his career grand slam, but there’s some stiff competition throughout the field, namely from many of his young contemporaries like Dustin Johnson, Justin Thomas and Rickie Fowler. Of course, we would be remiss without mentioning Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson, both of whom are among a litany of names looking to add another green jacket to their respective collections.

Simply put, this field for the Masters is loaded with stars, including many who have already played tremendous golf in 2019 both on the PGA Tour and worldwide. Narrowing this down to a champion and top finishers is a tough task, but we here at CBS Sports are certainly up to it. Take a look at our 1-87 ranking of the Masters field, and figure out when your favorites will tee off with our list of Thursday tee times.

So who will win the 2019 Masters, and which long shots will stun the golfing world? Visit SportsLine now to see the full projected 2019 Masters leaderboard from the model that nailed Patrick Reed’s victory last year, and find out.

Winner — Justin Thomas (16-1): Do I feel good about it? Not really. Am I thrilled with the pick? No. But I rolled with Thomas to start 2019, and I have no intention of deviating from it. There was a hour-long stretch last time around where he got a little frisky and flirted with the top of the board, and one of the things I like best is that he’s improved every year he’s played Augusta National. There’s a clear trajectory there that, when you combine it with his hole-less game, tells me he’s going to contend here for a long, long time.

Sleeper — Hideki Matsuyama (35-1): Matsuyama’s odds dropped from 45-1 or 40-1 to under 40-1 in the last few weeks, but he hasn’t finished outside the top 20 here in the last four seasons. He’s also second on the PGA Tour in approach shots (Thomas is first), and if he putts at all (at all!) he’ll be right there until the end.

Top 10 lock — Rory McIlroy: He hasn’t finished outside the top 10 here since 2013 and hasn’t finished outside the top 10 in any tournament in 2019. I don’t know what else to tell you.

Top 5 in order: Justin Thomas, Rory McIlroy, Matt Kuchar, Dustin Johnson, Bryson DeChambeau

Surprise prediction: I don’t know if it’s a surprise, but I think Tiger Woods is going to contend early and fade late. He’s coming in with better form than people think, but I think the weight of opening 68-69 will legitimately get to him on the weekend, and he’ll fade to a T15 or something like that. But boy, those first two and a half days will be something.

Winner — Jon Rahm (16-1): We’ve hit a point where it feels like the top tier of golf can’t get any more crowded, and yet the conversation about that top tier heading into the first major of 2019 doesn’t always include Rahm. Instead of seeing Rory finish the slam, Spieth get right or another former major winner slipping on a green jacket, I think we see the strength of the field in 2019 proven by adding validation to the spark that Rahm has provided so far in his professional career. He’s got all the shots, flirted with contention before last year’s meltdown and has spent significant time working on his on-course attitude. I don’t know if I’m ever going to pick Rahm to win a U.S. Open, but Augusta National seems to fit his eye enough to think it will happen eventually.

Sleeper — Sergio Garcia (50-1): It’s absurd to have a former Masters with two top-10s in the last two months listed this far back on the odds board. Garcia absolutely can win this week, and if anything, the controversies overseas and with Matt Kuchar in match play only reinforce the chances that he’s totally dialed in to where he needs to be in order make a run at winning a second green jacket.

Top 10 lock — Rory McIlroy: The way that McIlroy has been playing so far in 2019 is going to make anything short of Sunday afternoon contention a disappointment for fans, but if you’re looking for a high floor play, there doesn’t seem to be a better pick in the field. McIlroy needs to go low on Thursday or Friday to win, but even if he doesn’t — and especially if he doesn’t — the odds are good for at least one round in the 60s on the weekend. Whether it’s winning, losing close or making a late charge, there are more ways to envision a Rory top-10 than anyone else.

Top 5 in order: Jon Rahm, Justin Thomas, Justin Rose, Xander Schauffele, Rory McIlroy

Surprise prediction: Rickie Fowler will miss the cut. Rickie putted out of his mind last year when he, admittedly, played well enough to win the Masters. Maybe it’s a regression to the mean situation or maybe he just stinks it up on either Thursday or Friday, but overall I think our expectations for his follow-up to 2018 might exceed where his game is right now.

 

 

Masters 2019

Masters 2019 Live : The 2019 Masters is nearly here, starting off the 83rd edition of this storied event at Augusta National. While this tournament Masters 2019 does have the smallest field of any of the four golf majors, it boasts all the best talent on tour. In addition to the past champions that will tee off beginning on Thursday these players secure the right to compete in the Masters for life by earning a Masters 2019 green jacket there are contenders all seeking the glory that winning this tourney brings.

It’s that time of the year where everyone in the golf world has one question on their mind: Who are you picking to win the 2019 Masters? With an 87-man field featuring generational talent going head-to-head at Augusta National, rarely has such a call ever been more difficult.

All eyes are on Rory McIlroy this year as The Ulsterman looks to complete his career grand slam, but there’s some stiff competition throughout the field, namely from many of his young contemporaries like Dustin Johnson, Justin Thomas and Rickie Fowler. Of course, we would be remiss without mentioning Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson, both of whom are among a litany of names looking to add another green jacket to their respective collections.

Simply put, this field for the Masters is loaded with stars, including many who have already played tremendous golf in 2019 both on the PGA Tour and worldwide. Narrowing this down to a champion and top finishers is a tough task, but we here at CBS Sports are certainly up to it. Take a look at our 1-87 ranking of the Masters field, and figure out when your favorites will tee off with our list of Thursday tee times.

So who will win the 2019 Masters, and which long shots will stun the golfing world? Visit SportsLine now to see the full projected 2019 Masters leaderboard from the model that nailed Patrick Reed’s victory last year, and find out.

Winner — Justin Thomas (16-1): Do I feel good about it? Not really. Am I thrilled with the pick? No. But I rolled with Thomas to start 2019, and I have no intention of deviating from it. There was a hour-long stretch last time around where he got a little frisky and flirted with the top of the board, and one of the things I like best is that he’s improved every year he’s played Augusta National. There’s a clear trajectory there that, when you combine it with his hole-less game, tells me he’s going to contend here for a long, long time.

Sleeper — Hideki Matsuyama (35-1): Matsuyama’s odds dropped from 45-1 or 40-1 to under 40-1 in the last few weeks, but he hasn’t finished outside the top 20 here in the last four seasons. He’s also second on the PGA Tour in approach shots (Thomas is first), and if he putts at all (at all!) he’ll be right there until the end.

Top 10 lock — Rory McIlroy: He hasn’t finished outside the top 10 here since 2013 and hasn’t finished outside the top 10 in any tournament in 2019. I don’t know what else to tell you.

Top 5 in order: Justin Thomas, Rory McIlroy, Matt Kuchar, Dustin Johnson, Bryson DeChambeau

Surprise prediction: I don’t know if it’s a surprise, but I think Tiger Woods is going to contend early and fade late. He’s coming in with better form than people think, but I think the weight of opening 68-69 will legitimately get to him on the weekend, and he’ll fade to a T15 or something like that. But boy, those first two and a half days will be something.

Winner — Jon Rahm (16-1): We’ve hit a point where it feels like the top tier of golf can’t get any more crowded, and yet the conversation about that top tier heading into the first major of 2019 doesn’t always include Rahm. Instead of seeing Rory finish the slam, Spieth get right or another former major winner slipping on a green jacket, I think we see the strength of the field in 2019 proven by adding validation to the spark that Rahm has provided so far in his professional career. He’s got all the shots, flirted with contention before last year’s meltdown and has spent significant time working on his on-course attitude. I don’t know if I’m ever going to pick Rahm to win a U.S. Open, but Augusta National seems to fit his eye enough to think it will happen eventually.

Sleeper — Sergio Garcia (50-1): It’s absurd to have a former Masters with two top-10s in the last two months listed this far back on the odds board. Garcia absolutely can win this week, and if anything, the controversies overseas and with Matt Kuchar in match play only reinforce the chances that he’s totally dialed in to where he needs to be in order make a run at winning a second green jacket.

Top 10 lock — Rory McIlroy: The way that McIlroy has been playing so far in 2019 is going to make anything short of Sunday afternoon contention a disappointment for fans, but if you’re looking for a high floor play, there doesn’t seem to be a better pick in the field. McIlroy needs to go low on Thursday or Friday to win, but even if he doesn’t — and especially if he doesn’t — the odds are good for at least one round in the 60s on the weekend. Whether it’s winning, losing close or making a late charge, there are more ways to envision a Rory top-10 than anyone else.

Top 5 in order: Jon Rahm, Justin Thomas, Justin Rose, Xander Schauffele, Rory McIlroy

Surprise prediction: Rickie Fowler will miss the cut. Rickie putted out of his mind last year when he, admittedly, played well enough to win the Masters. Maybe it’s a regression to the mean situation or maybe he just stinks it up on either Thursday or Friday, but overall I think our expectations for his follow-up to 2018 might exceed where his game is right now.

Lowest round: 64 (-8)
Winning score: 274 (-14)
Winner’s Sunday score: 69 (-3)

Adam Silverstein, deputy managing editor

Winner — Rory McIlroy (7-1): Yes, he’s the favorite. Yes, he’s playing the hottest golf in the world right now. But I’ve been picking McIlroy in this space frequently over the last few years, and it’s been all for naught. Not this time. Not while I’m attending Augusta National for the first time and have watched him smoke the ball off the practice tees. Rory McIlroy is going to win the Masters. He’s the easy chose for a top 10 lock each year or a backdoor top five, but I think he gets it done here. Let’s just say … it’s in the air.

Sleeper — Adam Scott (40-1): I was tempted to go with Patrick Reed (50-1) here, until I remembered there has not been a back-to-back champion since Tiger Woods and there’s only been two in the last half-century. So sorry, Patrick, it just ain’t happening. Scott is exceedingly interesting with five top 15 finishes in his last eight Masters. It may only take him being in the zone on the greens Sunday to be the difference between another one of those finishes and a second green jacket.

Top 10 lock — Justin Thomas: My normal choice in this space is McIlroy — for obvious reasons — when I do not pick him to win. Instead, I default to Thomas because I sure am not going with my other secondary choice in Jordan Spieth. Seeing Thomas improve in each of his three outings at Augusta National has me believing.

Top 5 in order: Rory McIlroy, Tony Finau, Jon Rahm, Justin Thomas, Justin Rose

Surprise prediction: Phil Mickelson will miss the cut. Lefty has missed two cuts in the last five Masters despite his stellar play over most of his career. It’s hot here in Augusta, and the Masters is going to get away from someone quickly. If Mickelson is not nails on Thursday, it may be over before it even starts for him.

The Masters 2019

The Masters 2019 Live : The Masters 2019 Tournament Golf will be the 83rd edition of the Masters Tournament and the first of golf’s four major championships to be held in 2019. It will be held from April 11–14 at Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia. Our final pre-tournament ranking of the best bets to win at Augusta.

He is at the world’s most famous course at its famed event, and the sport’s most famous face is in front of him. But Jay DiPali does not seem to care in the least. As Tiger Woods hits his tee shot at the 16th hole, his head is swiveling every which way but the one it should be pointed.

That is until Woods, and partners Justin Thomas and Fred Couples, depart the tee box, which grabs DiPali’s attention. With fire in his belly and beer on his breath, he barks, “Skip. Skip! SKIP!” He is joined in unison by his friends and the thousand or so patrons surrounding the hole, per tradition. And their pleas are heard: Woods, Thomas and Couples ricochet their balls off the pond and onto the green. Cheers go up, and DiPali produces a glowing nod.

He then returns to the predicaments that have vexed him so, which appears to be the prospect of an empty cup (a gulp or two away from fruition) and whether the cadre of girls they were supposed to meet will show.

“Flow killer,” says DiPalio of Columbia, S.C., resigning himself to the fate that he and his buds have been stood up. He says this with no trace of glib, because—in spite of the panorama that lies before him—he holds it as true. Also a fit of pique: the lack of sundresses in the early morning. “Just killing my morning.”

It’s a line that will make many of this tournament’s obsessives—especially those not on property this week, their lottery bids unfulfilled, their quests for a secondary-market badge in vain—bite their putters in agony. But a line that speaks to a certain, and growing, sect of patrons at the Masters. More specifically, the area they congregate.

On the whole, the patrons at Augusta National are a different profile from the modern fan. They are well-informed, attentive, reserved, respectful, stemming from Bobby Jones’ standing mandate on behavior at the Masters.

“In golf, customs of etiquette and decorum are just as important as rules governing play,” wrote Jones in 1967. “It is appropriate for spectators to applaud successful strokes in proportion to difficulty but excessive demonstrations by a player or his partisans are not proper because of the possible effect upon other companies. Most distressing to those who love the game of golf is the applauding or cheering of misplays or misfortunes of a player. Such occurrences have been rare at the Masters but we must eliminate them entirely if our patrons are to continue to merit their reputation as the most knowledgeable and considerate in the world.”
This edict still serves as the M.O. of the tournament. Well, at least over most of its domain. At the edges of the delicate Masters ecosystem resides the 16th hole, an area that can be decidedly un-Augusta.

For many, golf is not the draw of the 16th; it’s the atmosphere. What they know about the sport—or more specifically, what they don’t—hammers that sentiment home. While Woods was on the 15th, four adult men, for the life of them, could not remember who won last year’s Masters, saved by the polite sigh of “Patrick Reed” from a volunteer. (Whether the sigh was at their ignorance or the divisive nature of the champ is anyone’s guess.) Most patrons name their canines Juniper, White Dogwood and Redbud; the average fan on the 16th thinks these are Jersey Mike’s subs.
Instead, the 16th is the place to be seen, to converse, to party. Especially to party.

“Why go anywhere else?” replies Bob Rummel, full drink in hand. “It sizzles here.” And wobbles, as a host of patrons are clearly enjoying their share of the spirits.

To be fair, there’s an inherent acceptance in 2019 that hosting a sporting event means entertaining non-sports fans. That’s why hospitality boxes are so important to new arenas, why ballparks have breweries and playgrounds attached to their diamonds. It applies to Augusta National, found in Berckmans Place.
But Berckmans is for businessmen and VIPs; there’s not a specifically designated socializing area for the common man. So, over the years, they made the 16th their own.

“It’s just people being themselves out here,” DiPali said, rejuvenated at the sight of newly-arrived co-eds. “You feel like you’re going to get yelled at, but here is just different.”Scholars debate when it started—the club itself isn’t sure, and Tom Kite, Lee Trevino and Ken Green have all taken credit for it—but it’s generally accepted that skipping a ball off the 16th pond came to prominence in the late ’80s. The patrons loved the magic trick, and soon called on the entire field to take part in the act.

Only the feeling wasn’t reciprocated, with many players, ahem, skipping the request. Davis Love III was chief among the detractors, feeling the practice went against what Jones and Augusta National co-founder Cliff Roberts had in mind.

“I didn’t think it was in the tradition of the Masters,” Love told Golfweek in 2016.

But the petitions persisted, and slowly the players succumbed to the cries. That included Love, who eventually joined in. His reasoning? “I started getting booed.”

“Once you understand that there are a bunch of fans that sit there all day and that’s the only day they come to the Masters, you realize this is good entertainment for them,” Love said. “And if all the chairmen haven’t stopped it, then I guess it’s OK.”

It is, in ways, peculiar, as those that encircle the 16th echo DiPali’s ambivalence towards the practice shots but become super invested once the player stride towards the water. Imagine a basketball crowd watch Steph Curry hit three after three in warm-ups, only to plead the Warriors star to play hacky sack with the ball.

Don’t get us wrong; it is cool to see a player glide a shot over the drink and onto the pristine green, but its novelty wears thin relatively quickly. At least to us; to the masses that flock to the 16th, it’s hypnotic.
“I’ve watched this 13 years and I still don’t know how they do it,” says Mark Little, 44. “Every time one lands on the green we (the crowd) react like it’s the first time.”

At a tournament, at a course, known for its restrictive ways, a bit of silliness can sometimes be welcomed. A silliness the 16th gallery is happy to emit.The Masters Tournament begins Thursday morning when 87 golfers competing for the fabled green jacket tee off at Augusta National Golf club. But a persistent rainstorm could delay parts of the tournament.

The Weather Channel says there’s a 60 percent chance of rain in Augusta, Georgia, on Friday. On Saturday there’s an 80 percent chance of rain, and it’s even higher on Sunday, during final-round play.

While Augusta National features a SubAir drainage system to handle any rain, the threat of thunderstorms and lightning is the main issue heading into the weekend. The course had to suspend practice play Monday and Tuesday due to inclement weather.